Dressing To Improve Performance

You’re all aware of the saying “dress for success” and while it works in your professional and dating lives, have you thought about how it could also work when playing sport or exercising?

In other words – the clothing you choose influences your performance on the sports field and in the gym as well as in other areas of your life. It might sound like a waste of time as you’re going to get hot and sweaty anyway so why not just throw on a worn out cotton t-shirt and some old shorts? But read on to find out how what you wear can affect your performance.

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The Right Clothing Boosts Confidence

If you are happy with the clothes you’re wearing when working out, then there is a greater chance you will want to exercise and push yourself more. When you have the right tools – well-fitted workout clothes that offer support in the right areas – you’re going to feel more confident. The confidence translates into better performance.

A Uniform Unites

If you’re playing for a team, then all of you wearing the same uniform, wearing your colors and being proud to represent your team will increase your chances of winning. You can even design your own from STC Teamwear and get something that makes you look and feel like champions.

Good Apparel Improves Performance

Certain outfits are currently banned in professional swimming because they shave time off a swimmer’s lap time by creating a more aerodynamic flow in the water. There is also clothing that can improve performance in other sports too, for example, you could get yourself a shirt that absorbs moisture from your body making your morning jogs more comfortable so you can stay out longer. Then make sure you have the right shoes for the right sport, so running shoes that are made for running or aerobics lack the flexibility, lateral stability, and traction required for other games.

The Right Gear Adds Protection and Prevents Injuries

Using improperly fitted equipment is a significant cause of sports-related injuries that can interfere with your workout routine. Have the right clothing for the right weather; if it’s sunny, you may want a cap to cover your head and protect your face. You might want to use gloves in the gym to protect your hands from developing calluses on the palms or if you’re out climbing rocks.

Shoes that don’t fit properly cause blisters, cramps and slipping that slows you down, and high-tops are required for protection of weak ankles.

Good Clothing Can Improve Movement

Don’t buy the wrong clothing just because it’s cheap; they probably won’t fit well. Paying full price gets you better value over the long run and can give you freedom of movement.

A tight shirt can restrict your movement, even if you can dunk, spike, swing or make other movements – your shots will be affected if you are aware of the tightness around your body.

Make sure your shorts don’t ride up or slip down when you are jumping. If you are wearing a cap – make sure it’s not too tight around your head but also ensure it won’t fall off or slip.

Compression Clothing Aids In Recovery

Compression clothing provides graduated compression to stimulate circulation. The result is a massaging effect which stimulates blood flow. The increased blood flowing through muscles removes the lactic acid produced during exercise, and as a consequence, recovery is boosted, and muscles are less sore and stiff.

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Cascade of Colour is a UK Male Lifestyle blog delving in to the world of Mens Fashion and Grooming, Food, Music, Design, Tech and Travel. Want to get in touch? Drop me an email at cascadeofcolour@gmail.com

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